COUNTRY DETAIL

$ gain in farm income
% gain in farm income
2014 2015 2014 2015
Kenya $170 $211 40% 48%
Rwanda $70 $54 53% 53%
Burundi $67 $99 99% 111%
Tanzania $78 $87 20% 14%
Weighted program average $116 $137 52% 55%
Click on a country for brief descriptions of key factors that drove impact in 2013 and 2014.

KENYA

Our Kenya program supports farmers growing maize and beans over one long season, and we also offer a range of add-on products such as solar lights, vegetable seeds, improved crop storage bags, cook stoves and sanitary pads.

Kenya has the highest $ impact of any country, driven by relatively large land sizes, the most robust offering of add-on products, and our long experience in the country (Kenya launched in 2006).

Between 2014 and 2015, dollar impact increased by $41 per farmer. This was attributable to several factors. We saw a much greater maize impact in 2015. In 2014 1AF farmers grew 20% more maize than comparison farmers, whereas in 2015 1AF farmers grew 40% more maize. We altered our training to include more detailed intercropping (growing maize and beans together) instructions which helped to boost overall yields. Finally, we continued to see strong adoption of high return add-on products, such as solar lights and trees.

 

RWANDA

Our Rwanda program supports farmers growing a wide range of crops, notably maize, climbing beans, bush beans, potatoes, and rice, over two seasons. We also offer a range of add-on products such as solar lights, trees, and coffee fertilizer. 

In 2015, we added an additional $43 in agricultural profit on average over the two growing seasons from our core program. Add-on products, such as trees and solar lamps, added another $11 to our average impact. Impact from these products is not as high as in other countries given the relatively lower energy costs (so smaller energy savings from solar lights), and the fact that fewer trees are distributed. Altogether, even this modest amount represents a 53% improvement in profits relative to a comparison group.

It is increasingly difficult for us to achieve high dollar impacts for One Acre Fund farmers relative to comparison farmers in Rwanda because nonparticipating farmers have improved access to training through farmer promoters and inputs through agro-dealers.  While this represents a measurement challenge (we have a role in the programs which reach comparison farmers), we view this overall as great news for farmers nation-wide. 

 

BURUNDI

Our Burundi program supports farmers growing maize, beans, and potatoes, over two seasons, and also offers solar lights on credit.

In 2015, we added $95 in agricultural profit on average over the 2 seasons. This was a big improvement compared to 2014 with large impacts for maize and potatoes relative to comparison farmers. We suspect that One Acre Fund farmers were better able to cope with the irregular rains than their neighbors.

Add-on products, such as trees and solar lamps, added another $4 per farmer on average. Impacts from add-on products are relatively small in Burundi for two main reasons. Firstly, Burundians generally spend less on energy than other countries, so it takes them longer to realize the returns from investing in a solar lamp, and secondly, adoption of these products is relatively low comparative to other countries. Still, together this represents a 111% improvement in profits relative to a comparison group.  We tend to see high percent improvements in Burundi because the base profit for farmers there is so modest, so each dollar improvement represents a significant improvement in a farmer’s income.

 

TANZANIA

Our Tanzania program supports farmers growing maize during one long season, and also offers solar lights on credit.

We added $73 in agricultural profit on average over the season we worked with farmers in Tanzania. Add-on products, such as solar lamps add another $14 to our average impact. Solar lights have a relatively high per adopter impact because energy costs, and therefore savings, are higher.  We quadrupled the number of solar light adopters in 2015 with 1 in 3 enrolled farmers taking a light.  Altogether this represents a 14% improvement in profits relative to a comparison group. The percent increase is relatively lower than in our other countries, as our Tanzanian farmers farm much more land, so the proportion of land dedicated to the One Acre Fund program on their whole farm is generally smaller. 

 

 

Country Detail reports

For further detailed information, please view our 2015 Annual Impact: Country Report and our 2014 Annual Impact: Country Report.

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